Seed Stitches Add Texture and Design to Plain Knitting

A "seed stitch" is created in a plain (usually stocking stitch) background by adding a few purl stitches into the knit rows.  These stitches can be almost randomly placed. or strategically placed to make designs in the stocking stitch.  The resulting purl stitches break up the monotony of stocking stitch and look like grains of sand or seeds.

Notes for all seed stitches
  • Seed stitches can replace stocking stitch in any knitting pattern.
  • Seed stitches do not alter the measurements of the fabric
  • Seed stitches simply give a different texture and design to plain knitted fabrics
  • Seed stitches create a simple and interesting alternative to plain stocking stitch
  • Seed stitches are a knitting designer’s simplest tool.
  • Any design can be created in seed stitch.

Be imaginative and try your own ideas. Make a design on graph paper and simply follow it. You can even create “pictures” in your fabric using seed stitches.

Here are some samples of seed stitches:





Single seed stitch:
Single seed stitches give only a subtle variation to stocking stitch.
The occasional purl stitch just breaks the monotony of stocking stitch.
You can create your own variations very easily by deciding how frequently you use the purl stitch and in what sequences.
Here I have only used a simple example of using a purl stitch every fourth rows and every fourth stitch in the row.
You can use your own variations such as in an 8 stitch sequence - purl every 6th and 8th stitch in the first row, stocking stitch for 5 – 7 rows, then purl every 2nd and 4th stitch in the next row repeating the sequence to the desired length.

  Instructions:
Cast on a multiple of 4 stitches
Row 1: *k3, p1* to end
All Alternate Rows: p
Row 3 & 7: k
Row 5: k1, *p1, k3* to last 3 sts p1, k2
These 8 rows form the pattern





Double seed stitch


  Instructions:
Cast on a multiple of 12 stitches
Row 1: *p2, k4* to end
All alternate rows: p
Row 3 and 7: k
Row 5: *k2, p2, k2* to end
These 8 rows form the pattern
A different variation with more texture would be to purl only one row between rows 1 and 5 making it a four row pattern instead of an 8 row pattern.



Seed Stitch (One in Four Row) Rib

Notes:
Seed stitch rib makes an interesting variation to plain stocking stitch for the body of a garment.
Very simple to do and very effective.
Although one out of every four rows is knitted in single rib, the knitted fabric does not have the characteristic stretch of true ribs because of the rows of stocking stitch in between.
The fabric lies more flat than plain stocking stitch, but still tends to curl up both length- and width-wise

Seed Stitch 1 in 4 rows Rib     Instructions:
    Cast on a multiple of 2 stitches
    Row 1: k
    Row 2: p
    Row 3: k
    Row 4: k1, p1 to end
   These four rows form the pattern for the stitch.


Chevron Seed Stitch:
Chevron seed stitch is a very attractive stitch for edgings, but can also be used for the body of garments.

     Instructions
   Cast on a multiple of 8 stitches
   Row 1: *p1, k5, p1, k1* to end
   Row 2: p2, *k1 p3, k1, p3* ending with a p1
   Row 3: k2, *p1, k1, p1, k5* ending with k3
   Row 4: *k1, p3* to end
   These four rows form the pattern





Lines with Seed stitches:


Oblique Seed Stitch lines:
Continuous Oblique seed stitch lines
 
   Instructions:
   Cast on a multiple of 6 sts
   Row 1: *k5, p1* to end
   Row 2: * p5, k1* to end
   Row 3: k1 *p1, k5* ending with k4
   Row 4: p3, *k1, p5* ending with k1, p2
   Row 5: k3, *p1, k5* ending with k2
   Row 6: p1, *k1, p5* ending with p4
Repeat these 6 rows for continuous oblique lines

Variations:
Broken Oblique Seed Stitch Lines:

 Broken Oblique Seed Stitch Lines    Instructions:
   Cast on a multiple of 6 sts
   Row 1 and 11: *k5, p1* to end
   Row 2: * p5, k1* to end
   Row 3 and 7: k1 *p1, k5* ending with k4
   Row 4 and 8: p3, *k1, p5* ending with k1, p2
   Row 5 and 9: k3, *p1, k5* ending with k2
   Row 6 and 12: p
   Row 10: p1, *k1, p5* ending with p4
   Row 11: *k5, p1* to end
These 12 rows form the pattern.

Double Seed Stitch: Broken Oblique Lines:

  Instructions:
Cast on a multiple of 8 sts
Row 1: *k6, p2* to end
Row 2: p1, *k2, p6* ending with k2, p5
Row 3: k4, *p2, k6* ending with p2, k2
Row 4: p3, *k2, p6* ending with p3
Row 5: k2, *p2, k6* ending with p2, k4
Row 6: p
Repeat these rows for the pattern



Horizontal Lines using Seed Stitch:

 Horizontal lines in seed stitch Instructions
Cast on a multiple of 10 sts
Row 1: *k4, p6* to end
All alternate rows; p
Row 3 and 7: k
Row 5: p5, *k4, p6* to last stitch, k4, p1
These 8 rows form the pattern.
You can easily change the sequence for shorter or longer lines and bigger or smaller spaces between the lines.
The lines could be knitted above each other instead of alternating their position. You would then only repeat rows 1 through 4 for the pattern.


Broken Vertical lines in Seed stitch:

Note: the seed stitch is used in alternate rows, otherwise it would form a “rib” and pull the purl stitches to the back of the work and the effect of seed stitches would be lost.
Doing it this way, the seed stitch is raised and stands out.

  Instructions
Cast on a multiple of 6 sts
Row 1and all alternate rows: k
Row 2, 4, 6 and 8: p3, *k1, p5* ending on p2
Row 10, 12, 14 and 16: p1, *k1 p5* ending with k1, p4
These 16 rows form the pattern.



Seed  Stitch Lattice:


Seed Stitch Lattice     Instructions
   Cast on a multiple of 8 sts
   Row 1: *p1, k7* to the end
   Row 2 and 8: *k1, p5, k1, p1* to end
   Row3 and 7: *k2, p1, K3, p1, k1* to end
   Row 4 and 6: *p2, k1, p1,k1 p3* to end
   Row 5: k4, *p1, k7* ending with p1, k3


These 8 rows form the pattern


Seed Stitch in Groups or Designs:

Seed Stitches in Groups   Instructions:


These .. rows form the pattern for this grouping of seed stitches.



These rows form the pattern for ...